Home Events Continuation and Innovation: Chinese Bronzes of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)
Continuation and Innovation: Chinese Bronzes of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Speaker

  • Lu Pengliang
    Lu Pengliang
    Associate Curator of Chinese Decorative Art

    Lu Pengliang joined the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2013. He serves as Associate curator of Chinese decorative art and has curated exhibitions on various subjects, including From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th centuries (2016-17); Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer (2017-18); Children to Immortals: Figural Representations in Chinese Art (2018-20). Pengliang has published widely on Chinese metal works, ceramics, textiles, and literati objects.

Location

Online
Online Event

Date

10 Nov 2020

Time

6:00 pm

Continuation and Innovation: Chinese Bronzes of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Lu Pengliang joined the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2013. He serves as associate curator of Chinese decorative art and has curated exhibitions on various subjects, including From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th centuries (2016-17); Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer (2017-18); Children to Immortals: Figural Representations in Chinese Art (2018-20). Pengliang has published widely on Chinese metal works, ceramics, textiles, and literati objects.

Continuation and Innovation: Chinese Bronzes of the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368)

Study of Chinese bronzes usually focuses on ancient pieces cast before the Han dynasty (206 BCE to 220 CE). Known as “later Chinese bronzes,” bronzes from the Song dynasty (960-1279) onward, however, have received relatively scant attention. These vessels tend to be treated as forgeries or imitations of archaic bronzes and are viewed as lacking true significance. But, these “later” bronzes actually played a much more significant role in China than is currently understood. The Yuan dynasty was a key era for later bronze production: it not only continued the traditional style, but also created a new fashion for the following dynasties. This lecture will explore the overlooked artistic and cultural value of Yuan-dynasty bronze works based on the speaker’s first-hand examination of works from archaeological discoveries and in global museum collections.

Sponsored by

Image Caption: Vase with archaistic design (detail). Yuan dynasty (1271-1368), 14th century. Bronze. H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Brooke Russell Astor Bequest, 2014. (2014.449)

The Oriental Ceramic Society
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